terça-feira, 29 de abril de 2014

Chamada: Trust and Democracy (The Monist)

A cientista política Patti Lenard (Ottawa) será a editora da edição "Democracia e Confiança" do periódico The Monist. Serão aceitos trabalhos sobre para o papel da sociedade civil, das associações e medidores de confiança institucional no funcionamento de democracias. Artigos serão aceitos até janeiro de 2015

Patti Lenard é autora do livro Trust, Democracy and Multicultural Challenges 


The Monist: Trust and Democracy (deadline january 2015)

I’m editing an issue of the Monist, on Trust and Democracy, to be published in January 2016.  Submissions due January 2015.  
The role of trust in democracies is typically taken for granted: democracies are successful if and only if they are underpinned by widespread trust relations among their citizens. When citizens trust each other, and when they trust their political leaders, citizens will voluntarily comply with the rules and regulations that govern their lives; in other words, they will cooperate to bring about the benefits typically attributed to living under democratic rule.  One measure of widespread trust is the willingness of citizens to participate in civil society organizations where they learn to cooperate and therefore to trust others. This special issue of The Monistwill focus on the relationship between trust and democracy, for example as outlined by scholars such as Robert Putnam, Pierre Rosanvallon, and Mark Warren. Contributors are asked to focus on questions including but not limited to the following: Is trust essential to democracy? Is trust the right concept with which to explain effective democratic performance, or are other factors (for example, social capital) better suited to do so? How does trust enable democracy to function?
Interested authors should be in touch with me at patti.lenard@uottawa.ca

sábado, 26 de abril de 2014

Forst: Justificação e Crítica

O periódico on-line da Universidade de Notre Dame (Notre Dame Philosophical Review) publicou uma resenha do livro novo de Rainer Forst Justification and Critique: Towards a Critical Theory of Politics. A resenha é assinada pelo Uwe Steinhoff  professor de política na Universidade de Hong Kong. No livro Forst reúne seus artigos mais recentes sobre justificação e discute o papel das utopias no pensamento filosófico moderno. 





Rainer Forst

Rainer Forst, Justification and Critique: Towards a Critical Theory of Politics, Ciaran Cronin (tr.), Polity, 2014, 216pp., $24.95 (pbk), ISBN 9780745652290.

Reviewed byUwe Steinhoff, The University of Hong Kong


Rainer Forst's new book is, according to him,
an attempt to develop the program of a theory of justification further -- first when it comes to clarifying basic concepts of political philosophy and, in addition, as regards its implications for critical theory and the possible limits of a mode of thought which accords central importance to discursive justice. (viii)
These concepts prominently include human dignity, human rights, justice, justification, recognition, and tolerance, among others. Yet the book is a rather unsystematic collection of essays, and hence the connections between the different chapters are often tenuous. In particular the last part (“Beyond Justice”), which contains three chapters discussing Henrik Ibsen, Stanley Cavell, and Theodor Adorno, Hannah Arendt, and utopian literature, has little to do with the preceding part of the book. The biggest deficit of Justification and Critique (JaC), however, is that for someone "who has so much to say about justification" (viii), Forst provides little by way of justification for his own core ideas, which have remained basically unchanged -- and undefended -- since his publication of Kontexte der Gerechtigkeit (Contexts of Justice, CoJ) in 1994.
In the following I will concentrate on Forst's "principle of justification" and his (individual) "right to justification" (in doing so I will also refer to his previous works).
In Contexts of Justice Forst noted that the stages of Habermas's discourse theory of morality "consist in a reconstruction of the argumentative presuppositions of justifying norms, one that leads to the formulation of a discourse principle that serves as a principle of morality or democracy . . . for justifying (in each case different) norms under conditions of mutual and forceless argumentation" (CoJ, 192).[1] Forst himself, however, does not attempt to reconstruct argumentative presuppositions, nor does he attempt to show that they would lead to the discourse principle. Instead, he simply stipulates (more on this below) an equivalent to the discourse principle (without engaging any critics of discourse ethics), namely his own "principle of justification," on which in turn a "right to justification" is supposed to be based (JaC 151, 170-171).
This basic right to justification is based on the recursive general principle that every norm that is to legitimize the use of force (or, more broadly speaking, a morally relevant interference with other's actions) claims to be reciprocally and generally valid and therefore needs to be justifiable by reciprocally and generally non-rejectable reasons. Reciprocity here means that neither party makes any claim to certain rights or resources that are denied to others (reciprocity of content) and that neither party projects its own reasons (values, interests, needs) onto others in arguing for its claims (reciprocity of reasons). One must be willing to argue for basic norms that are to be reciprocally and generally valid and binding with reasons that are not based on contested 'higher' truths or conceptions of the good that can reasonably be questioned and rejected. Generality, then, means that the reasons for such norms need to be shareable among all persons affected, not just the dominant parties. (JaC, 140)
The question, of course, is why one should accept any of these claims; not least since the meaning of some of them is not even clear. For example, what is the meaning of the parentheses? Are only norms that legitimize the use of force morally relevant? If so, why? Or are norms that legitimize non-violent interference with other people's actions also morally relevant? And why is only interference relevant? Why not non-interference (like refraining from helping somebody in need)? Moreover, by which criteria is it to be decided what is "morally relevant" in the first place? Is a criterion that stands in need of justification simply being presupposed here? Furthermore, and most importantly, why should a norm's validity depend on its justifiability to everyone (at least to every person affected)? In the end, does this whole idea that moral principles have to be justified to everybody not rest on a confusion of two senses of justification: justification in the sense of the speech act of giving to someone a justification for something, and justification in the sense of a proposition's or principle's property of being justified for someone, that is, of being legitimately applicable to her, him, or it? Is it not quite possible that something is justified for a child molester or genocidal dictator, that is, legitimately applicable to him or her, without anybody having to (be able to) justify it to him or her?[2] Forst, despite his emphasis on justification, answers none of these questions, in fact, he does not ask them, nor does he provide a conceptual analysis of the concept of justification.

quarta-feira, 23 de abril de 2014

Repensando a Esfera Pública

Rúrion Melo (USP) apresentará seu texto "Repensando a Esfera Pública" nessa quinta-feira (24/04) como parte dos seminários semestrais de ciência política da USP. O evento é aberto a todos os interessados. O working paper pode ser encontrado no link abaixo:


- Rurion: "Repensando a Esfera Pública" 





segunda-feira, 21 de abril de 2014

Fraser: A "transnacionalização" da esfera pública

Transnationalizing the Public Sphere o mais recente livro de Nancy Fraser (New School) retoma seu debate de longa data com a teoria da ação comunicativa de Habermas para repensar a categoria de esfera pública em um mundo globalizado. As propostas de Fraser são debatidas por Kate Nash, David Owen, dentre outros. 

O texto original de Fraser de 2007 pode ser encontrado no link abaixo:






Nancy Fraser et al. 

Is Habermas’s concept of the public sphere still relevant in an age of globalization, when the transnational flows of people and information have become increasingly intensive and when the nation-state can no longer be taken granted as the natural frame for social and political debate? This is the question posed with characteristic acuity by Nancy Fraser in her influential article ‘Transnationalizing the Public Sphere?’ Challenging careless uses of the term ‘global public sphere’, Fraser raises the debate about the nature and role of the public sphere in a global age to a new level. While drawing on the richness of Habermas’s conception and remaining faithful to the spirit of critical theory, Fraser thoroughly reconstructs the concepts of inclusion, legitimacy and efficacy for our globalizing times. 

This book includes Fraser’s original article as well as specially commissioned contributions that raise searching questions about the theoretical assumptions and empirical grounds of Fraser’s argument. They are concerned with the fundamental premises of Habermas’s development of the concept of the public sphere as a normative ideal in complex societies; the significance of the fact that the public sphere emerged in modern states that were also imperial; whether ‘scaling up’ to a global public sphere means giving up on local and national publics; the role of ‘counterpublics’ in developing alternative globalization; and what inclusion might possibly mean for a global public. Fraser responds to these questions in detail in an extended reply to her critics.

An invaluable resource for students and scholars concerned with the role of the public sphere beyond the nation-state, this book will also be welcomed by anyone interested in globalization and democracy today.


sábado, 19 de abril de 2014

Krugman: A nova Belle Époque

Paul Krugman resenhou a tradução de Capital in the Twenty-First Century do economista francês Thomas Pickett para a NY Review. Além de escrever uma resenha na qual as teses de Pickett são apresentadas de modo claro e respeitoso, Krugman acrescenta um outro ponto importante, mas insuficientemente explorado no livro referente ao caso norte-americano. Ainda que o crescimento da desigualdade nos EUA respeite o padrão-Pickett (razão entre a taxa de retorno do capital em relação ao crescimento econômico) Krugman chama atenção para o papel dos "supersalários" (e não apenas os ganhos com capital) entre os 1% mais ricos e seu impacto na reprodução da desigualdade - o que, na verdade, não muda muito o quadro sombrio de Pickett caso os herdeiros desses "super-executivos" tenham acesso a essa fortuna.

[...]

Capital still matters; at the very highest reaches of society, income from capital still exceeds income from wages, salaries, and bonuses. Piketty estimates that the increased inequality of capital income accounts for about a third of the overall rise in US inequality. But wage income at the top has also surged. Real wages for most US workers have increased little if at all since the early 1970s, but wages for the top one percent of earners have risen 165 percent, and wages for the top 0.1 percent have risen 362 percent. If Rastignac were alive today, Vautrin might concede that he could in fact do as well by becoming a hedge fund manager as he could by marrying wealth.
What explains this dramatic rise in earnings inequality, with the lion’s share of the gains going to people at the very top? Some US economists suggest that it’s driven by changes in technology. In a famous 1981 paper titled “The Economics of Superstars,” the Chicago economist Sherwin Rosen argued that modern communications technology, by extending the reach of talented individuals, was creating winner-take-all markets in which a handful of exceptional individuals reap huge rewards, even if they’re only modestly better at what they do than far less well paid rivals.
Piketty is unconvinced. As he notes, conservative economists love to talk about the high pay of performers of one kind or another, such as movie and sports stars, as a way of suggesting that high incomes really are deserved. But such people actually make up only a tiny fraction of the earnings elite. What one finds instead is mainly executives of one sort or another—people whose performance is, in fact, quite hard to assess or give a monetary value to.

Para saber mais sobre livro, ver nosso post: "Capitalismo ou Democracia?"


Why We're in A New Gilded Age
Paul Krugman


Capital in the Twenty-First Century

by Thomas Piketty, translated from the French by Arthur Goldhammer
Belknap Press/Harvard University Press, 685 pp., $39.95


Thomas Piketty, professor at the Paris School of Economics, isn’t a household name, although that may change with the English-language publication of his magnificent, sweeping meditation on inequality, Capital in the Twenty-First Century. Yet his influence runs deep. It has become a commonplace to say that we are living in a second Gilded Age—or, as Piketty likes to put it, a second Belle Époque—defined by the incredible rise of the “one percent.” But it has only become a commonplace thanks to Piketty’s work. In particular, he and a few colleagues (notably Anthony Atkinson at Oxford and Emmanuel Saez at Berkeley) have pioneered statistical techniques that make it possible to track the concentration of income and wealth deep into the past—back to the early twentieth century for America and Britain, and all the way to the late eighteenth century for France.

Thomas Piketty, professor at the Paris School of Economics, isn’t a household name, although that may change with the English-language publication of his magnificent, sweeping meditation on inequality, Capital in the Twenty-First Century. Yet his influence runs deep. It has become a commonplace to say that we are living in a second Gilded Age—or, as Piketty likes to put it, a second Belle Époque—defined by the incredible rise of the “one percent.” But it has only become a commonplace thanks to Piketty’s work. In particular, he and a few colleagues (notably Anthony Atkinson at Oxford and Emmanuel Saez at Berkeley) have pioneered statistical techniques that make it possible to track the concentration of income and wealth deep into the past—back to the early twentieth century for America and Britain, and all the way to the late eighteenth century for France.
The result has been a revolution in our understanding of long-term trends in inequality. Before this revolution, most discussions of economic disparity more or less ignored the very rich. Some economists (not to mention politicians) tried to shout down any mention of inequality at all: “Of the tendencies that are harmful to sound economics, the most seductive, and in my opinion the most poisonous, is to focus on questions of distribution,” declared Robert Lucas Jr. of the University of Chicago, the most influential macroeconomist of his generation, in 2004. But even those willing to discuss inequality generally focused on the gap between the poor or the working class and the merely well-off, not the truly rich—on college graduates whose wage gains outpaced those of less-educated workers, or on the comparative good fortune of the top fifth of the population compared with the bottom four fifths, not on the rapidly rising incomes of executives and bankers.
It therefore came as a revelation when Piketty and his colleagues showed that incomes of the now famous “one percent,” and of even narrower groups, are actually the big story in rising inequality. And this discovery came with a second revelation: talk of a second Gilded Age, which might have seemed like hyperbole, was nothing of the kind. In America in particular the share of national income going to the top one percent has followed a great U-shaped arc. Before World War I the one percent received around a fifth of total income in both Britain and the United States. By 1950 that share had been cut by more than half. But since 1980 the one percent has seen its income share surge again—and in the United States it’s back to what it was a century ago.
The result has been a revolution in our understanding of long-term trends in inequality. Before this revolution, most discussions of economic disparity more or less ignored the very rich. Some economists (not to mention politicians) tried to shout down any mention of inequality at all: “Of the tendencies that are harmful to sound economics, the most seductive, and in my opinion the most poisonous, is to focus on questions of distribution,” declared Robert Lucas Jr. of the University of Chicago, the most influential macroeconomist of his generation, in 2004. But even those willing to discuss inequality generally focused on the gap between the poor or the working class and the merely well-off, not the truly rich—on college graduates whose wage gains outpaced those of less-educated workers, or on the comparative good fortune of the top fifth of the population compared with the bottom four fifths, not on the rapidly rising incomes of executives and bankers.
It therefore came as a revelation when Piketty and his colleagues showed that incomes of the now famous “one percent,” and of even narrower groups, are actually the big story in rising inequality. And this discovery came with a second revelation: talk of a second Gilded Age, which might have seemed like hyperbole, was nothing of the kind. In America in particular the share of national income going to the top one percent has followed a great U-shaped arc. Before World War I the one percent received around a fifth of total income in both Britain and the United States. By 1950 that share had been cut by more than half. But since 1980 the one percent has seen its income share surge again—and in the United States it’s back to what it was a century ago.
Still, today’s economic elite is very different from that of the nineteenth century, isn’t it? Back then, great wealth tended to be inherited; aren’t today’s economic elite people who earned their position? Well, Piketty tells us that this isn’t as true as you think, and that in any case this state of affairs may prove no more durable than the middle-class society that flourished for a generation after World War II. The big idea of Capital in the Twenty-First Century is that we haven’t just gone back to nineteenth-century levels of income inequality, we’re also on a path back to “patrimonial capitalism,” in which the commanding heights of the economy are controlled not by talented individuals but by family dynasties.

terça-feira, 15 de abril de 2014

Entrevista: John Mccormick

Robert Jubb (Leicester) e Stuart White (Oxford) entrevistaram o professor de ciência política John Mccormick (Chicago) a respeito do seu livro - já célebre - Machiavellian Democracy. Mccormick defende um modelo populista de democracia contra a concentração de poder econômico e político nas democracias representativas contemporâneas, fundamentando seus argumentos no modelo de contestação política republicana apresentada por Maquiavel. 

Para quem se interessar pela teoria democrática de Mccormick, a Revista Brasileira de Ciência Política traduziu o artigo "Democracia Maquiaveliana: controlando as elites com um populismo feroz" no qual o autor sintetiza os principais argumentos do seu livro. 


Can democrats learn from Machiavelli?



When politicians are described today as ‘Machiavellian’ the implication is that they are no more than cynical graspers at power for its own sake. Most historians of political thought have long argued that Machiavelli’s own views and politics were more complex than this. In his 2011 book, Machiavellian Democracy (previously reviewed for OurKingdom by Guy Aitchison), the political theorist John P. McCormick offers an innovative reading of Machiavelli. According to McCormick, Machiavelli was not only a republican thinker, but by the standards of his day, and our own, a radically democratic one. Moreover, some of Machiavelli’s ideas, such as his advocacy of plebeian, tribunate institutions, arguably remain relevant to today’s discussions of democratic renewal. Robert Jubb and Stuart White interview John here for the ‘Democratic Wealth’ series.
OurKingdom: Machiavelli's key works are The Prince and the Discourses. One is a manual on how to get and use princely power, the other a discussion of republics. Do we need to reconcile these two works? If so, how?
John P. McCormick: I think that the two works actually reconcile themselves.  Machiavelli declares in the Discourses that republics must be founded or fundamentally reformed by a single individual.  Romulus is his quintessential example of republic’s founder, and Cleomenes is one of his chief examples of a republic’s reformer.  Thus, Machiavelli’s advice to princes within The Prince(and, indeed, within the Discourses itself), in so far as it aids individual founders and reformers, is perfectly compatible with his republicanism.  Moreover, Machiavelli offers the same, often brutally immoral advice to political actors—princes and magistrates, peoples and elites—in both books.
OurKingdom: You argue in Machiavellian Democracy that previous scholarship has not attended enough to differences in republican thinking in Florence at the time of Machiavelli, leading to a misrepresentation of Machiavelli. Can you explain? Why might this have happened?
John P. McCormick: I think that many scholars have overcompensated in their efforts to underplay or contextualize Machiavelli’s immorality or amorality by disproportionately emphasizing the continuity of his political thought with that of traditional Roman republicans like Cicero and Florentine civic humanists likeLeonardo Bruni.  In so doing, they tend to overlook the unprecedented extent to which Machiavelli departs from the political thinking of republicans from the past or from his own intellectual milieu: in particular, they often miss the full extent to which Machiavelli was an advocate of popular participation within republics; indeed, a champion of popular ascendance over the elites of republics.  There are, of course, exceptions to this charge:  Felix Gilbert andJohn Pocock quite convincingly demonstrate how Machiavelli’s more democratic republicanism differs from the aristocratic republicanism of his younger contemporary Francesco Guicciardini - although, I’d say that they did not go far enough in this regard.
OurKingdom: Let’s explore the theme of popular participation further. You emphasise the way that Machiavelli thought that the wealthy of his time, primarily the nobility, were the greatest threat to a free society. What kinds of institutions did Machiavelli think would help to empower the people relative to the nobles? How did Machiavelli use Roman history to illustrate both the importance of empowering the people against the nobles and the means necessary to do so?
John P. McCormick: First and foremost, Machiavelli recommended that republics revive the institution of the plebeian tribunate from ancient Rome, an institution that he claimed made Rome “more perfect” by enabling common Roman citizens to “beat back the insolence of the nobles.”  Rome’s wealthiest and most prominent citizens were ineligible to hold the office of plebeian tribune, an office with extensive power within the Roman constitution: tribunes wielded veto authority over most policy measures; initiated and led discussions over legislation in Rome’s popular assemblies; and they publicly tried wealthy and prominent citizens before the people for political crimes.  When the Medici asked Machiavelli to draft a constitutional model for the reformation of the Florentine Republic, Machiavelli included a tribunesque office in the constitution, which he called “provosts.”

domingo, 13 de abril de 2014

Anarquismo




por Liniers

Tributo a Dworkin (NYU Law Review)

Em outubro do ano passado um grupo de filósofos e juristas reuniram-se na Universidade de Nova York para a carreira de Ronald Dworkin, falecido no ano passado ("Dworkin's memorial celebration"). Neste mês a NYU Law Review publicou os textos apresentados no evento. Dentre os participantes, Thomas Scanlon ("Three Thoughts about Ronnie") e os colegas de universidade de Dworkin Jeremy Waldron ("The Enrichment of Jurisprudence"), Liam Murphy ("A Joy to Hear Him Speak") e Thomas Nagel ("In Memoriam: Ronald Dworkin"). Os textos são curtos e valem a pena para quem tem interesse em entender melhor o papel da filosofia de Dworkin no ambiente acadêmico norte-americano. 

Veja abaixo os textos completos:

- Tributes: Professor Ronald Dworkin

Last year, the NYU community lost an intellectual giant in Professor Ronald Dworkin. The school and the Law Review joined together to honor Professor Dworkin’s writings, ideas, and of course, his legendary colloquia. Academics, philosophers, and judges gath- ered to pay tribute. In the pages that follow, we proudly publish written versions of those tributes. The ceremony closed with a short video clip of one of Professor Dworkin’s last speeches, titled Einstein’s Worship. His words provide a fitting introduction:

"We emphasize—we should emphasize—our responsibility, a responsibility shared by theists and atheists alike, a responsibility that we have in virtue of our humanity to think about these issues, to reject the skeptical conclusion that it’s just a matter of what we think and therefore we don’t have to think. We need to test our convictions. Our convictions must be coherent. They must be authentic; we must come to feel them as our convictions. But when they survive that test of responsibility, they’ve also survived any philosophical challenge that can be made. In that case, you burnish your convictions, you test your convictions, and what you then believe, you better believe it. That’s what I have to say about the meaning of life. Tomorrow: the universe".  

terça-feira, 8 de abril de 2014

Reforma tributária no Brasil

O economista José Roberto Afonso (IBRE-GV) publicou no final do ano passado um relatório de sua pesquisa sobre o sistema tributário brasileiro - e a urgência de sua reforma. Entretanto, ao contrário dos argumentos convencionais, Afonso chama atenção para a injustiça social da ausência de progressividade na carga tributária no país: segundo os últimos dados (de 2004), enquanto famílias com renda de até 2 salários mínimos comprometem quase 50% de sua renda com impostos (a maior parte indiretos), famílias no extremo oposto, formadas por famílias com renda de 30 salários mínimos, comprometem apenas 26%. A incidência tributária atrelada ao consumo (e não à renda) e níveis baixos de imposto sobre patrimônio jogam o ônus da carga tributária brasileira justamente sobre aqueles menos beneficiados pela produção da riqueza social.

[...]

Dos tradicionais impostos sobre patrimônio e transmissão, o Brasil mal arrecada 1.5 por cento do PIB. O imposto sobre veículos (IPVA) arrecada cada vez mais que aquele sobre imóveis urbanos (IPTU). O imposto sobre herança é tão incipiente que arrecada um terço a menos que a parcela federal no seguro obrigatório para mortes no trânsito. Pior ainda, a carga do territorial rural mal chega à segunda casa decimal (0,01 por cento do PIB), ou seja, em todo o país arrecada menos imposto que os imóveis só do bairro de Copacabana no Rio de Janeiro. Ora, se nem conseguimos cobrar tradicionais impostos patrimoniais, como arriscar em um difícil e algo exótico imposto sobre grandes fortunas? Ainda assim, na hipótese (politicamente) impossível de um brutal aumento na tributação sobre o patrimônio, desse 1 por cento do PIB, isoladamente pouco se mudaria na distribuição da incidência de uma carga  global entre 36 por cento do PIB. 

O artigo original pode ser consultado na página do Wilson Center ou no link abaixo:


- Afonso: "A Economia Política da Reforma Tributária: o Caso Brasileiro"

Resumo:

Sendo o Brasil um dos países desiguais no mundo, seria natural esperar que a reforma tributária tivesse a equidade como um dos itens de sua agenda, se não dos mais importantes. Porém, a questão tem sido ignorada nas iniciativas de propostas dessa reforma, que, por sua vez, passou a ocupar espaço cada vez menor e focalizado nas discussões econômicas nacionais. Cálculos e análises sobre porque os mais pobres pagam proporcionalmente à sua renda familiar mais impostos que os mais ricos nunca saíram da esfera acadêmica, e despertando muito mais interesse na literatura estrangeira do que na nacional. A eficiência em gerar uma carga tributária brasileira (na casa de 36 por cento do PIB) muito alta, acima da média das economias emergentes, contribui (ainda que implicitamente) o desinteresse de diferentes governantes em promover e até mesmo em discutir uma reforma do sistema. 

A falta de interesse sobre como o ônus do imposto alcançada a sociedade, em especial de pensadores, políticos e governantes de vocação mais socialista ou à esquerda, reflete uma ideia simplista de que o gasto público, em especial com proteção social, seria o instrumento único ou suficiente para se promover uma política pública redistributiva. A ânsia é por repetir o ideal de um estado de bem estar social, no melhor padrão europeu, mas se ignora que no Brasil é muito maior a concentração de renda, antes e depois da aplicação dos impostos, por serem os indiretos muito superiores aos diretos.

A falta de politização do debate técnico da equidade fiscal e a falta de vontade política de governos (de liberais a socialistas) em promover uma reestruturação tributária (que pudesse colocar em risco a elevada arrecadação) são explicações para a ausência da questão nos debates e para a apatia dos esforços em favor desta reforma. 

domingo, 6 de abril de 2014

A estrutura básica como objeto da justiça

Sexta-feira (11/04) Denilson Werle (UFSC) apresentará seu trabalho "A estrutura básica como objeto da justiça" na Faculdade de Filosofia Letras e Ciências Humanas da USP. O evento ocorrerá as 10h na sala 115 do prédio de Filosofia e Ciências Sociais. 

Veja abaixo uma entrevista de Werle para o Instituto Humanitas da Unisinos na qual o filósofo discute o papel das teorias contratualistas na filosofia política contemporânea:

Os méritos do neocontratualismo nas sociedades democráticas

Por: Márcia Junges e Luciano Gallas

IHU On-Line - A partir do horizonte filosófico do neocontratualismo, quais são as questões centrais na teoria política contemporânea?

Denilson Luis Werle - Essa é uma pergunta difícil de ser respondida em poucas palavras, não só porque o horizonte filosófico do neocontratualismo é muito diversificado, com diferentes interpretações da tradição do contrato social, mas também porque envolve as obsessões pessoais daquele que observa as discussões contemporâneas. 

De um ponto de vista mais geral, acho que o grande mérito do neocontratualismo está em ter procurado dar um novo impulso crítico-reflexivo às democracias constitucionais, já mais ou menos consolidadas, reformulando certas questões clássicas da filosofia política moderna — por exemplo, como fundamentar objetivamente nossos juízos morais e políticos; como saber se uma norma é correta ou errada; como justificar princípios para uma sociedade justa; como entender os ideais de liberdade e igualdade e o ethos da democracia; o que torna legítimo o exercício do poder político — só que agora pensadas no contexto de conflitos sociais e políticos de sociedades democráticas. Não se trata mais de pensar sobre a origem do Estado, a natureza da soberania e do poder político, mas em encontrar formas de realizar os ideais de igualdade e liberdade e de inclusão do outro nas sociedades democráticas. Claro, não deixam de ser problemas filosóficos renitentes, mas que são também pensados e reformulados em um contexto de novas lutas sociais, que em grande medida se valem da linguagem dos direitos fundamentais para alcançarem seus objetivos. E a questão central, para a filosofia política em geral e para o neocontratualismo em particular, é encontrar critérios normativos ou um ponto de vista moral imparcial que permita aos próprios cidadãos deliberarem e julgarem a legitimidade das diferentes reivindicações que dirigem uns aos outros.

De uma forma um pouco esquemática, pode-se dizer que as reflexões se concentram em dois domínios temáticos distintos, mas que interligam economia e cultura: por um lado, os conflitos distributivos em torno dos benefícios e encargos da cooperação social, que se acirram cada vez mais com as sucessivas crises da economia de mercado globalizada; por outro, problemas de tolerância e de reconhecimento em sociedades marcadas pelo pluralismo dos planos de vida individuais e das formas de vida culturais. Vale a pena mencionar aqui que, embora o neocontratualismo seja considerado uma filosofia política de teor mais normativo, acho que não é muito frutífero simplesmente reduzi-lo a algum tipo de normativismo abstrato (ou que teria uma antropologia individualista) que procura pensar questões apenas de forma analítica e derivar sociedades ideais fictícias a partir da prancheta ou da mesa do filósofo. É justamente o contrário: as questões mencionadas são pensadas como problemas reais de nossa sociedade e na forma de uma crítica imanente, por assim dizer, recorrendo àqueles ideais normativos que, no decorrer de lutas e conflitos sociais, foram se enraizando na própria autocompreensão cultural, nas práticas e instituições do constitucionalismo democrático moderno. A ideia básica que dá sentido ao projeto neocontratualista é o conteúdo da normatividade (moral, política e jurídica) poder ser considerado legítimo ou justificado, se puder ser objeto de um acordo público e racional entre cidadãos ou pessoas autônomas, livres e iguais. Claro, isso ainda deixa uma boa margem para controvérsias, na própria tradição do contrato social, sobre o que significa cada termo dessa ideia. 

IHU On-Line - Em uma sociedade justa, como é possível conciliar a questão da justiça distributiva com a temática da tolerância?

Denilson Luis Werle - Essa conciliação é possível quando a “estrutura básica de uma sociedade” estiver orientada por princípios de justiça que sirvam como uma base pública de justificação para que os próprios cidadãos e cidadãs possam articular e fundamentar suas diferentes reivindicações, seja por distribuição de renda e riqueza, seja pelo respeito e reconhecimento de suas concepções de vida boa, e isso a partir de um amplo leque de razões (éticas, morais, políticas, religiosas, jurídicas). Acho que nisso reside o papel dos princípios de justiça: eles não fornecem uma solução determinada, mas permitem que os cidadãos e cidadãs tenham uma linguagem geral de justificação pela qual podem dar sentido às suas experiências de injustiça. Mas, claro, isso não é tão simples.

O longo debate entre Nancy Fraser  e Axel Honneth  sobre “redistribuição” e “reconhecimento”, com todas as réplicas e tréplicas, mostrou justamente o quanto é difícil pensar a articulação entre estes dois âmbitos. Mas o resultado final desse debate não me parece muito frutífero. Acho que, afinal, não cabe elaborar uma teoria sobre o que está em jogo nessas reivindicações concretas — se são expressão da luta por paridade de participação ou são diferentes formas de luta por reconhecimento. O que me parece prioritário em uma sociedade justa é que todos tenham um direito básico à justificação e que a esfera pública da sociedade democrática se constitua em um processo de aprendizagem que permita aos cidadãos e cidadãs manifestarem suas diferentes vozes e articularem suas reivindicações por justiça, seja da ordem da distribuição ou da tolerância. Ambas são reivindicações que têm uma origem comum em experiências de injustiça, de exploração e de humilhação, que, na prática e nas narrativas de justificação, estão geralmente interligadas umas com as outras.

IHU On-Line - Qual é a origem da ideia de tolerância?

Denilson Luis Werle - Essa ideia tem uma história bem antiga e rica, que demandaria muito espaço e tempo para ser contada, da antiguidade até a modernidade — e não é à toa que o livro de Rainer Forst , Toleranz im Konflikt  (talvez, até o momento, o livro que fez a análise mais exaustiva sobre a ideia e história da tolerância, infelizmente sem tradução para o português e com uma tradução reduzida para o Inglês, autorizada pelo próprio autor), tenha singelas 800 páginas, nas letrinhas da Suhrkamp. A concepção moderna de tolerância teve sua origem nas sangrentas e devastadoras guerras religiosas no início da modernidade, que colocaram em xeque os padrões tradicionais de legitimação do poder político, forçaram a separação entre Estado e religião e assinalaram a necessidade de pensar formas de convivência social entre pessoas que não apenas tinham interesses diversos, mas também valores éticos e culturais distintos e muitas vezes profundamente divergentes e irreconciliáveis.

Em seu primeiro momento, a tolerância assumiu uma forma pejorativa (muito criticada por Goethe, por exemplo) como política de poder para manter a segurança e a ordem social, em que uma maioria tolera a convivência com minorias. Era uma tolerância como condescendência, permissão, em que minorias, como cidadãos de segunda classe, eram “toleradas” de modo indulgente, contanto que não perturbassem a ordem pública e a cultura dominante. No decorrer de processos complexos de racionalização do poder e de racionalização da própria moral e autocompreensão cultural, que não tenho como explicar aqui, foi se enraizando em práticas sociais e instituições políticas e jurídicas uma concepção mais igualitária e universalista de tolerância: a tolerância baseada no respeito moral do outro enquanto pessoa, independentemente de sua filiação comunitária, religiosa, de sua identidade, sexo, gênero, raça. E é essa ideia de tolerância, baseada no respeito moral e na dignidade humana, que se coloca como um dos fundamentos normativos do constitucionalismo democrático moderno. Claro, isso não nos livra das muitas ambiguidades e mal-entendidos que acompanham a trajetória da ideia de tolerância.


sexta-feira, 4 de abril de 2014

Capitalismo ou Democracia?

Lançado neste mês em inglês, o livro Capital in the Twenty-First Century do economista francês Thomas Pickett (École d'Economie de Paris) está sendo considerado por alguns como a revitalização das teses marxistas para o século XXI. Pickett desafia os defensores do livre-mercado com a tese (originalmente concebida por Ricardo e Marx) de que o crescimento econômico capitalista é inerentemente instável. Segundo os dados macroeconômicos de Pickett, após um interregnum igualitário depois as duas Guerras Mundiais e da crise de 29, os níveis de acúmulo de capital e, consequentemente, desigualdade econômica está retornando aos níveis intoleráveis do final do século XIX. Contudo, diferentemente de outros economistas igualmente severos nas críticas ao crescimento da desigualdade, Pickett procura identificar um conjunto de "leis" de crescimento do capital a partir das quais é possível demostrar que a organização capitalista da sociedade - quando funciona - tende necessariamente a aumentar a desigualdade social. Nossa escolha diante desse cenário sombrio é apenas uma: Capitalismo ou Democracia?

Algumas resenhas do livro:






Thomas Pickett

What are the grand dynamics that drive the accumulation and distribution of capital? Questions about the long-term evolution of inequality, the concentration of wealth, and the prospects for economic growth lie at the heart of political economy. But satisfactory answers have been hard to find for lack of adequate data and clear guiding theories. In Capital in the Twenty-First Century, Thomas Piketty analyzes a unique collection of data from twenty countries, ranging as far back as the eighteenth century, to uncover key economic and social patterns. His findings will transform debate and set the agenda for the next generation of thought about wealth and inequality.
Piketty shows that modern economic growth and the diffusion of knowledge have allowed us to avoid inequalities on the apocalyptic scale predicted by Karl Marx. But we have not modified the deep structures of capital and inequality as much as we thought in the optimistic decades following World War II. The main driver of inequality--the tendency of returns on capital to exceed the rate of economic growth--today threatens to generate extreme inequalities that stir discontent and undermine democratic values. But economic trends are not acts of God. Political action has curbed dangerous inequalities in the past, Piketty says, and may do so again.
A work of extraordinary ambition, originality, and rigor, Capital in the Twenty-First Centuryreorients our understanding of economic history and confronts us with sobering lessons for today.

quarta-feira, 2 de abril de 2014

ANPOF 2014: Inscrições abertas

O XVI Encontro Nacional da Associação Nacional de Pós-Graduação em Filosofia (ANPOF) abriu as inscrições para a submissão de trabalhos de pesquisadores de pós-graduação em todas as áreas da filosofia. Elas podem ser feitas até o dia 28/04. Neste ano o evento ocorrerá na cidade de Campos do Jordão (SP) entre os dias 27 e 31 de outubro.  Veja abaixo o link e o edital:

XVI Encontro da ANPOF (Campos do Jordão)

O Encontro será realizado em Campos do Jordão, uma cidade turística situada a 150 km de São Paulo. A cidade foi escolhida por contar com uma grande estrutura hoteleira, necessária a um evento da dimensão dos Encontros Nacionais da Anpof, por sua proximidade do Aeroporto de Guarulhos e por estar localizada entre São Paulo, Rio de Janeiro e Minas Gerais, o que facilita o acesso daqueles que preferirem evitar o transporte aéreo.

Mais do que isto, é uma cidade agradável e acolhedora, na qual esperamos poder construir um ambiente adequado aos debates e à convivência durante o Encontro.
As atividades ocorrerão em locais próximos entre si, na Vila Capivari, uma região atraente da cidade, repleta de bares, restaurantes, praças e equipamentos culturais. É uma região ideal para a convivência social e cultural, apropriada para aproximar os participantes e enriquecer sua experiência pessoal e acadêmica.

FORMAS DE PARTICIPAÇÃO

Os interessados poderão participar do evento:
  • com apresentação de trabalhos – pesquisadores, professores e pós-graduandos, que receberão certificados de apresentação e de participação;
  • sem apresentação de trabalho – público inscrito, com direito a certificado de participação.
Todos os participantes poderão contar com a infraestrutura de apoio disponibilizada para o evento.

INSCRIÇÕES COM APRESENTAÇÃO DE TRABALHO

Podem apresentar trabalhos professores, pesquisadores com título de mestre ou doutor e pós-graduandos. As inscrições para apresentação de trabalhos no XVI Encontro estarão abertas entre os dias 17/02/2014 e 28/04/2014. As propostas deverão conter título e resumo expandido com mínimo de mil e máximo de 2 mil caracteres.
Os participantes poderão apresentar suas comunicações conforme as orientações a seguir.
  • Docentes das instituições vinculadas à Anpof terão 45 minutos para apresentação.
  • Outros Doutores e doutorandos terão 30 minutos para apresentação.
  • Mestres e mestrandos terão 15 minutos para apresentação.

MESAS-REDONDAS, MINICURSOS E OUTRAS ATIVIDADES

Paralelamente aos debates dos GTs e às Sessões Temáticas, com trabalhos inscritos por meio do Programas de Pós-Graduação, há uma agenda de Conferências, Mesas-redondas, Minicursos e diversas outras atividades, preparadas pelos próprios GTs e pela Direção da ANPOF.
No caso das Mesas-redondas e minicursos, eventuais propostas de atividades deverão ser apresentadas diretamente aos GTs responsáveis pela temática, ou pelo e-mail diretoria@anpof.org.br.

INSCRIÇÕES SEM APRESENTAÇÃO DE TRABALHO

No mesmo período também estarão abertas as inscrições para participantes que não pretendem apresentar trabalhos, incluindo estudantes de graduação.

AGENDA DE INSCRIÇÃO DE TRABALHOS

  • 17/02 Início do prazo de inscrição de trabalho nos GTs
  • 28/04  Final do prazo de inscrição de trabalho nos GTs
  • 02/06 Publicação da lista de trabalhos aprovados
  • 10/10  Prazo final para envio dos trabalhos completos caso seus autores queiram disponibilizá-los no site da Anpof para o período do evento
  • 17/11  Prazo final para envio de trabalhos revisados para publicação em e-book com conteúdo do XVI Encontro Nacional.

terça-feira, 1 de abril de 2014

IV Seminário Discente de Ciência Política (USP)

A partir de segunda-feira (7) o Departamento de Ciência Política da USP inicia seu seminário anual de pesquisa de pós-graduação. A programação do IV Seminário Discente pode ser consultada no site do departamento (DCP-USP). Já os trabalhos a serem discutidos encontram-se disponibilizados no link: Trabalhos IV Seminário Discente (DCP-USP). Destaque para as mesas de teoria política com os debatedores Bernardo Ferreira (UERJ) e Denilson Werle (UFSC) e os trabalhos de Renato Francisquini, Marcos Silveira , Roberta Soromenho e Lilian Sandretti. A conferência de abertura "Quali Quanti: diálogos atuais" será ministrada por Charles Kirschbaum (INSPER).